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Monday, May 22, 2017

Number 2052: Green Lantern and Doiby Dickles go to a costume party

The original (if you prefer, “Earth Two”) version of Green Lantern puts on a costume over his GL costume for a party. He and his dumpy little buddy, Doiby Dickles, take on a villain from the future who landed in America in the 1940s after aiming for another time. Knodar, the villain, is the world’s last criminal! Also the dumbest for missing his time target. (Not much smarter are the future people who put the last criminal in a museum jail, rather than a real prison.)

Speaking of time, Green Lantern’s time as a forties superhero was coming to a close. With this issue, All-American Comics #100 (1948), Green Lantern was replaced on the cover by the Western hero, Johnny Thunder. A couple of issues later, All-American Western would replace the venerable flagship title of Maxwell Charles Gaines’ original comic book line, in partnership with DC Comics. Green Lantern would go on until 1949 with his own title, and until 1951 in All Star Comics, but after that would disappear until the new (if you prefer, “Earth One”) version would appear in 1959. Sheldon Mayer, who had been editor, quit that position to go back to drawing. Issue #100 was the first by editor Julius Schwartz, and the powers-that-be at DC thought some changes in the line-up were in order.

Credits by the Grand Comics Database have John Broome as writer, and Irwin Hasen the artist.













8 comments:

Joe Hinman said...

sorry man the original is earth 2. trust me on this one.

Justin said...

I knew about the Alan Scott version of Green Lantern, but never realized he was based on "Gotham." Was this the same city as Batman, or just a coincidence of naming? We're there any GL/Batman crossover stories back in the Golden Age?

Pappy said...

Justin, I don't know. Maybe some of my other readers would know and tell us...? I'm not up on the original Green Lantern.

Ryan Anthony said...

Recently, I was watching a behind-the-scenes segment on an episode of Doctor Who, and one of the show's designers commented that the future as presented in a story (be it TV, movies, or comics) should really look like a product of the era in which the story was created. That's definitely true in stuff like the original Star Trek series, and it's true in old comics, as well. In this one, they put Knodar behind old-fashioned bars and even kept him in with, as he says, old-fashioned locks. Also antique is Knodar's reference to a "girl," rather than female or woman, criminal or just "criminal" without reference to sex. And then there's the first time machine, which looks like a jalopy with wings--and a crank, even! (I don't blame Knodar for missing his target century; he's lucky that thing got off the ground.) Additionally, there's the "Radio of the Future" which still has dials and tubes like they had in the 40s. Finally, they still have paper books in the 25th century. I guess no one could even imagine ipads and Kindles then.

Joe's right that the original GL was from Earth-Two, even though he came before his Earth-One counterpart. Blame Julie Schwartz and Gardner Fox for the numbering. They even later retrofitted Alan Scott with a different, more clunky, oath and gave his cool "Brightest Day" version to Hal Jordan.

To answer Justin's question, Alan Scott's Gotham City is the same as Batman's, at least in later stories. It does seem strange to me that they never teamed up in the 40s.

Darci said...

I don't recall when Alan Scott was ID'd as living in Gotham, the same city as Batman, but it was back in the Golden Age. His radio station broadcast there.
Hope this helps!

Joe Hinman said...

Yes it is same Gotham but I don;'t think he and Batman ever crossed paths except in All Star comics.In those days Artists shyd away from team ups because too many heroes to draw.

Justin said...

Thanks for the info, good people.

Pappy said...

Thanks, Joe, I have lost track of those alternate Earths. I changed it to Earth Two in the text, and appreciate you putting me straight.