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Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Number 1773: Fighting Yank and the young old man

I feel a kinship to Osborne Witherspoon in this story from Startling Comics #45 (1947). Osborne is feeling his age. Me too. There are days when I creak like a rusty gate. I could use a charm to feel younger, like old Witherspoon gets from a Native American.

Fighting Yank, aka Bruce Carter, is guided by an old spirit, the ghost of his ancestor, who fought in the Revolutionary War. Bruce is no stranger to old people.

The artwork and story are unattributed by the Grand Comics Database.











8 comments:

Daniel [oeconomist.com] said...

Yep, that twist could be spotted comin' down Main Street.

Interesting how the Yank rather casually kills a couple of men here. In the first case, it seems straight-forward self-defense, but in the second it's more like one of those save-the-state-a-trial things.

I think that Quality might have been able to do more with the Fighting Yank and especially with the Black Terror than did Nedor.

Ryan Anthony said...

I'll skip my explanation of why the crooks' plot was dumb, because I've just got to point out the incredible continuity error on page 10. In panel 2, the Yank yanks (heh heh) one of the baddies off the above cliff before he can hit the goodies with dynamite ("YAAAAGH!"). Yet, in panel 4, the crook is back up with his buddy, and they're just learning why their explosives didn't work! WTF?! That's definitely one of the worst comics goofs I've ever seen.

Hey, there's some foreshadowing on page 3 of what's coming for the villains: the monogram "O.W." These guys sure felt the owies later!

J_D_La_Rue_67 said...

Interesting story, with a (pretty obvious) moral. Sometimes I worry about aging. When I see my dad (he'll be 90 this November) moving slowly or having difficulties eating his meal I'm worried. But then I think, I have to, that he still can move and eat without any help; that he survived WW2 and two heart attacks; that he has people who cares for him, and I feel better. If I may give everyone an advice, try not to show your old people that you are concerned or excessively worried for their health, for this may bring them down. It's not so easy, though.
Chief Shomish's trick is not as stupid as it seems. I mean, mistaking a radiator cap for an ancient idol IS stupid, and the fact that it made an athlete of Whiterspoon IS stupid, but helped him realize that gates, even rusty ones, are still made of iron. Ah-ehm!

Oh yes, the story: nice art. The Ghost is completely useless here. Matter of fact, the Fighting Yank thing is useless too. This could well have been an adventure for a group of normal guys, and it would have been better.
I love that "plane-copter" of the crooks. I wonder if there really was such a model.

Pappy said...

Ryan, the blue-suited bad guy must've had a good recovery time from the fall, just two panels.

Pappy said...

Daniel, I find the Nedor heroes generally lacking. The stories look like they weren't carefully plotted or something, and the book The Talented Miss Highsmith gave me a glimpse into the process at the company. Patricia Highsmith (The Talented Mr. Ripley, Strangers on a Train) was a writer for editor Richard Hughes. Everett Raymond Kinstler, who also worked in the office, described the creative process at Nedor:

"Hughes would commission a script: 'Here's an idea for the Fighting Yank, Patricia. I want one dealing with Nazis and submarines.' And Pat would have to come up with a synopsis or a scenario [and eventually] come back with a script. Hughes was a very nice man, very gentle, supportive and understanding, and he would do some minor editing on the script. And the script would then be turned over to the artists in the bullpen . . ."

And looking at this Fighting Yank story, that is how I imagine its origin.

Pappy said...

J D, here's my wish for continued health for your father. My mother had dementia, and didn't know her family the last few years of her life. It was very frustrating. We can accept the physical disabilities that come with aging, but the loss of memory and ability to speak was the toughest part of dealing with my mother's last few years.

I'm sure my own grandchildren see me as some old codger. And rightly so. Anyone over the age of 40 probably seems elderly to them.

The kids are gone now. Mrs. Pappy flew with them back to Pennsylvania yesterday. I would like to live closer and see them more often, but thought that the five weeks they lived with us this summer is probably more than I would see them if I lived in their town.

I am proud to say that even though I am curmudgeonly, I only lost my temper with them once. Errr, maybe twice...or three times. Heh heh. What was I saying about memory loss?

Darci said...

Hi Pappy,
Some of the artists listed in Jerry Bails Who's Who for the Fighting Yank feature are:
ALTMAN, GERALD
ANDERSON, HARRY
ASTARITA, RAFAEL
BACHLE, LEO
BALD, KEN
BARE, AL
BATTEFIELD, KEN
BINDER, JACK
BLUMMER, JON
BUTTS, BOB
CHU, HING
DOWD, VIC
GREENE, JOE
GREGG, GEORGE
HAMDEN, GUS
HARFORD, RAY
HEARNE, JACK
HOLMDALE, RED
KINSTLER, EVERETT
KOSTE, FRANK
LAPICK, RUDY
LE BLANC, ANDRE
LOTH, PAULINE
MAYO, RALPH
MENZER, KURT
MESKIN, MORT
MIDDLETON, OWEN
MOLDOFF, SHELLY
PECKOVER, EDMUND
POTTER, JIM
QUINLAN, CHARLES SR.
RICO, DON
RISS, PETE
ROBINSON, JERRY
ROUSCH, CLARENCE
SCHAFFENBERGER, KURT
SCHWARTZ, MILT
SMALL, JON
SPRANGER, JACK
TOMSEY, CHARLIE
WARD, BILL
WEISBECKER, CLEM
WESTLAKE, JOHN
WEXLER, ELMER

Pappy said...

Darci, good lord! (Choke!) That is quite a list. I might be able to recognize the styles of about ten of those artists, but I wouldn't even venture a guess as to did the story I posted here. It does not look familiar. Thanks for providing the information.