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Friday, October 17, 2014

Number 1645: Frankenstein and the Beautiful Dead

The poor monster can’t get a break when it comes to female companionship. In this story, from Frankenstein #32 (1954), he has two loves, both of them lacking conversational skills. Since the monster doesn’t talk that would normally suit him fine. With these women, though, there is a reason for them being mute.

Dick Briefer is the author and artist of this tragic tale.










7 comments:

Daniel [oeconomist.com] said...

Now-a-days, the Monster might try another alternative [NSFW].

But, really, if he wanted any sort of human or human-like companionship, then he shouldn't have proceeded as he did upon the outset of his '50s revival. Sure, there are dames that go for that sort of thing, but it's not as if there were a mixer to which he come have gone to meet them.

7f7f3e2a-4856-11e4-900a-bb8e57f8828f said...

A well done comic book story that would have certainly impressed me as a kid. Now grown up some, I admire even more than back then the layout, the expressive drawing, the inking with some pen and a lot of fine brushwork. My hat's off to Dick Briefer.

Brian Barnes said...

There's always been the idea in comics that recently dead bodies are easily pose-able flush full of rosy skin dolls. This is not the case.

Also, you don't get super powers from radiation!

Odyzeus! said...

Oh, Frankie... the bitter irony of it all.

Pappy said...

Daniel, obviously Frankenstein was lonely long before the Internet. Had he had Match.com who knows what kind of soulmate he would have found.

Pappy said...

7f7, I totally agree with your assessment of Briefer's artwork. It is also telling in how much comics changed in a short time that someone decided (was it Briefer himself?) that his formerly funny character should morph into the more traditional monster.

Pappy said...

Brian, as my dear late Big Pappy often told me, "Son, make sure they're still warm. The cold ones don't move around as much." I assume he was speaking figuratively.